Serving Kerr County with a Conscience

The New Martin Marietta Quarry: My View by Mary Matthews

GRAVEL QUARRIES: 11 POINTS

After reading the headline in the Kerrville Daily Times for March 9, 2016, “Martin Marietta: We Will Fight City Control,” and reading about the spectacle of a private corporation standing up in Council Chambers and speaking—with such disrespect, indeed almost contempt—dictating to, and threatening, the Kerrville City Council—I felt compelled to write this editorial.

Members of the Kerrville City Council are the elected representatives of the citizens of Kerrville. They are elected to enact the wishes of their constituency and to do what’s best for the entire city of Kerrville—NOT to support a private industrial development that is, without question, NOT good for the city of Kerrville, its growth, or its residents, including its ETJ. To me, the speech by Martin Marietta’s (MM) Chance Allen at the City Council Meeting on March 8 was insulting, and a challenge: “Who Owns the City of Kerrville and Kerr County—The Citizens, and Their Elected Representatives, or Corporate Bully Martin Marietta?”

Unfortunately, many people have not taken the time to support their City Council representatives, who have vowed to fight MM over the onerous quarry proposal that MM has forced onto the city and homeowners in the ETJ (extra-territorial jurisdiction.) The City is correct in its decision to NOT support MM on its choice of a quarry site. This site is eminently unsuitable for industrial development!

No matter how hard Chance Allen tries to sugarcoat MM’s mining operations, GRAVEL QUARRIES ARE UGLY, COSTLY, AND DEADLY. The only people who benefit from the gravel mining industry are the mining companies and their shareholders and landlords, who become MILLIONAIRES, many times over—AT THE EXPENSE OF THE PUBLIC. Here are 11 reasons why everyone should fight Martin Marietta on this site: Reasons that are based on facts and on actual evidence, from their mining operations currently working east of the City of Kerrville.

  1. Horrorific Guadalupe River Valley and riparian-area destruction, with no legal requirements imposed by the State of Texas to remediate. This wholesale destruction, and then abandonment, hurts the value of all neighboring properties AND hurts the City of Kerrville: The ugliness of gravel mining has a severe negative impact on local tourism dollars. That’s why, although these mines are a necessary evil, in other states they are placed in industrial-zoned areas out of sight of residences. The Guadalupe River Valley is a major natural attraction of Kerrville and Kerr County. Both the City and the County should be jealously guarding its scenic beauty and its environmental health.
  2. Hazards to Health: The dust and dirt produced by this mine will be unbelievable. Residents who listen to Allen’s propaganda about “working with neighbors” are living in a fantasy. NOTHING will stop the dust and dirt from this mine from getting into homes and affecting the breathing of everyone living in them. MM is counting on the fact that residents are too poor and too uneducated to afford legal counsel, when this air pollution kills the elderly and disables the young. And make no mistake: TCEQ does NOTHING to mitigate this baleful haze, just ask those living around the present quarry sites. Better yet, see for yourself—when driving west on Highway 27, travelers can’t miss the huge dust cloud smothering the river valley—it’s from the MM Bedrock Quarry, and other quarries operating here, including Drymala. In fact, Kerr County is Gravel Quarry Heaven—because, in the past, the Kerr County Commissioners Court and the City of Kerrville have done nothing to stop the devastation.
  3. Irresponsible, self-interested control over large sources of water: Quarries waste water; take water that should be shared with other landowners—for life!—divert waters from replenishing the river; pollute rivers and streams with silt and run-off; and sell waters for profit (It is known that MM sold water from its other operations—water taken from private neighboring landowners and Nowlin’s Hollow, a major tributary of the Guadalupe River—to the Kerrville/Kerr County Airport.) Has anyone ever checked on MM’s business activities to see how they have managed their water rights? For their own profit, to be sure, and at the expense of the public, surrounding property owners, and the City of Kerrville’s tax base. Citizens have a voice in water usage because they vote for their City Councilperson, Kerr County Commissioner, and Headwaters and UGRA representatives. But they have no voice in the immense abuse of water by these gravel quarries—all so MM can become even wealthier.
  4. By choosing this site, MM maliciously and purposefully ignores the PROPERTY RIGHTS of all of the people who own homes, and live, around the MM quarry site. MM has NO respect for these people, and for this reason we should have no respect for this company! With the operation of this quarry, it is guaranteed that property values around the site will be ZERO. It is hard to understand politicians who continue to spout the worn-out “property rights” slogan—that only applies to MM--to defend MM. MM is the latecomer to this site; they are not the only entity entitled to “property rights.” What about all of the homes surrounding the site? What about THEIR property rights? The right to enjoy their homes and families, free from a rock crusher in their front yard? Why does Chance Allen keep bringing this subject up? Because he has found that it has hit home with some unthinking leaders, and because NO ONE stands up to defend the private homeowners and THEIR property rights.
  5. Damage to local roads requires continual maintenance, paid by the taxpayer—all to benefit the gravel quarries. What a travesty that on top of everything else, we pay for MM’s roads! Yet NOT ONE PERSON spoke up against MM at the Kerr County Commissioner Court’s hearing on new load limits for Split Rock Road. And there’s more, on the subject of Kerr County Road and Bridge (KCR&B). Clearly, KCR&B, its Director Mr. Charlie Hastings, and its Flood Plain Administrator John Hewitt, all have a giant conflict of interest in any business they transact with MM and the other quarries. Not only is KCR&B the entity that hands out the permits necessary for the mining companies to mine in the floodplains—but it also buys gravel from the very businesses it is supposed to be regulating—the quarries! Seriously, is KCR&B going to jeopardize the deals they make with local quarries for road gravel, just because a gravel quarry destroys a few homes and a few people? All taxpayers should see the excellent, like-new quality of the blacktop road that runs next to MM’s Bedrock Quarry—take a drive down Sutherland Lane—you will see that KCR&B takes very good care of MM’s transportation needs, at taxpayer expense.
  6. It is a well-known fact that quarry trucks are a major cause of highway accidents—just Google it! At the new Split Rock Quarry, semis will be going in and out of the site, onto Highway 27—“24-7.” This is right across from a high school, on a highway MM will be sharing with teens just beginning to drive—teens that are precocious, impatient, impulsive, and dare-devil. Children will be killed, and when that happens, it will be too late to complain. Why is the administration and parents of Our Lady of the Hills High School not attending these meetings, and picketing MM? (See two photos, one of a gravel truck accident on Hwy. 27 just east of the airport, and another showing congestion with trucks pulling in and out of the MM Bedrock facility on Hwy. 27.) How many accidents each year are caused by gravel trucks, in Kerr County? TXDOT has the statistics on this, someone should find the answer.
  7. After the next big flood—when people lose their homes, their property, their pets, and their lives—the flooding will be called “An Act of God.” But God is not responsible for flooding caused when MM and other gravel quarries alter the floodplain, with permits granted by Kerr County! Engineers are not Gods. The streams and tributaries to the river in this area—and they are many—have not even been mapped. FEMA maps along the Guadalupe River are wrong, and the officials know they are wrong; but Kerr County Floodplain Administrator John Hewitt refuses to sensibly ask FEMA for help in remapping, because that would affect the ability of developers to mine and build in the floodplain. Local officials, including the UGRA, have no idea how much water is going into the river from these tributaries, because many of them are flowing underground—the entire area is karst topography, including the Airport. In the next flood, how much water will there be in these streams, and at what point will it reach the river? What effect will these streams have on a rise downstream? Since so little is known about this, it’s simply impossible that John Hewitt can grant permits to MM to completely destroy the natural drainage and the floodplain, and still be confident as to what impact this will have on neighboring land and the river. And don’t let the County say “There is nothing we can do.” The County can regulate gravel mining, in spite of County Attorney Stebbins’ insistence to the contrary. The local government agency AND the community are supposed to decide floodplains, based on history as well as engineering. The City already has zoned out mining within its limits (but not in the ETJ.) The County could deny floodplain permits to mining—but they never do. And remember, “God helps those that help themselves.”
  8. Before MM bought the Bedrock facility, it was locally owned and mined. This local gravel company actually destroyed a registered Kerr County Cemetery, the Moore Cemetery, that was situated in the middle of the Bedrock mine site. In spite of the complaints from family members, written in letters to Commissioner Bill Williams, their pleas were ignored, and THE CEMETERY AND EVERY GRAVE AND GRAVESTONE WERE GROUND UP FOR GRAVEL.
  9. Every day, gravel mines grind up the irreplaceable historic and pale-ontological heritage of Kerr County. This is a remarkable scientific heritage that our children will never see. I know for a fact that MM—in the Bedrock mine east of our ranch—ground up an enormous Columbian mammoth skeleton, with incredible tusks. I know this because a brave MM employee from Center Point went back to the mine after dark and salvaged some of the skeleton and tusk from the mine’s sidewall, and I was given a piece of the tusk for the Naylor Ranch archives. Rumor has it that another Pleistocene megafauna skeleton, a sabertooth cat, probably Smilodon fatalis—was dug up at the Wheatcraft Mine in Center Point. This is one of the most interesting creatures of the Pleistocene, 14,000 years ago, that lived right here in our area, and probably encountered the first humans who entered the river valley. After some research it was found that if there really was a sabertooth cat skeleton, it was extremely rare and valuable—there is not another such skeleton in the entire state of Texas, in spite of the fact that the name Smilodon fatalis and the best examples come from this state! Skeletons that the public can see are in the collections of the La Brea Tar Pits in L.A., the National Museum of Natural History in Washington, D.C., and the American Museum of Natural History in New York City. How awesome that would be, to have this skeleton displayed at the art center in downtown Kerrville! But the public will never see any of these Paleolithic treasures.
  10. The convenience granted to local contractors to be able to buy gravel, almost in our front yard, does not provide enough public benefit to offset the negatives. What will these contractors do when every gravel site on the river has been destroyed? Why doesn’t the City or the County erect a concrete recycling plant in an outlying, industrial area? A concrete recycling plant would offset starting new gravel pits.
  11. The City of Kerrville has the right to support and protect the city’s interest with planning and zoning that will insure the future economic viability of the Kerrville community. What retiree would want to buy in the City or the County when their investment in their home and land could be undermined, and destroyed, any day, by the placement of a gravel mine—an INDUSTRIAL use—next door? During a drought, when small landowners’ wells go dry, because these gravel quarries are taking the water, what options are open to them? The answer is NONE, unless they can afford an attorney, become annexed by the City, or have the funds to afford to drill deeper (an option that which not too far in the future will not even be available!) Are these same retirees aware that during times of severe drought there is not even enough water to fight fires in certain areas? Realtors who are loathe to support the effort against MM should pay attention to the fact that at the present time, it is not safe to buy any land located on a river or major stream in Texas, due to the dominance of the gravel industry. Luckily for the real estate business, this basic fact is not advertised extensively right now—but with the anger and frustration residents feel over the quarry issue, it could become a major ad campaign.

The above “Gravel Quarries: 11 Points” should bring home that unregulated gravel quarries are a terrible, destructive evil with only one purpose: to make the mining companies rich beyond belief, at everyone else’s expense. Each responsible, conscientious person should do everything they can to see that MM does not win the Split Rock Quarry battle against the City of Kerrville and its ETJ neighbors.

Mary Matthews

“FOR EVIL TO TRIUMPH IT IS SUFFICIENT THAT GOOD MEN DO NOTHING.” Edmund Burke, Political Theorist and Philosopher


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Kerr County Quarry Meeting

SHOCK AND DESPAIR DESCRIBE VICTIMS OF MARTIN MARIETTA

January 28, 2016, from Kerrville, Texas

Gravel Giant Martin Marietta (MM) Rushes Ahead

On Wednesday evening, January 27 at 6 p.m. at the Kerr County Livestock Pavilion, a tragic event unfolded as residents of Kerr County attended a “town hall meeting” scheduled by Precinct Two Commissioner Tom Moser. Many people attended; the parking lot at the pavilion was full and all of the chairs were taken in the vast hall. The subject was corporate mogul Martin Marietta’s new Kerr County gravel mine, which has been established in the ETJ (extra territorial jurisdiction) of the city of Kerrville, amidst subdivisions, heavy Highway 27 traffic, and across the street from Our Lady of The Hills Catholic High School.

In spite of the meeting scheduled last night and ongoing efforts to stop the mine, MM chose to ignore local, county, and state officials, and began excavations on the property the week of January 18th.

Victims in Shock

The mood could be described as one of shock and despair as surrounding property owners and those affected by the mine wandered in and out of the meeting. As revealed by some public questions, the large majority had never been involved in such a conflict before, and they were ill-equipped to deal with the complexities of fighting the gravel mine. Several asked “Will Kerr County buy the property after it is mined?” Obviously the answer to this question is “No.” Many were bitterly resigned to the fact that their homes, the result of a life-time’s work that they hoped to pass onto their children, were suddenly rendered worthless. One attendee, Mrs. Donald Oates, had lived in her house for 40 years, and had already given it to her children; now instead of the beautiful Guadalupe Valley river view, the property would be overlooking a gravel mine, with all of the attendant dust, dirt, noise, and traffic.

Moser Censures Testimony

The meeting was sponsored by the Kerr County Commissioner’s Court. Tom Moser, Commissioner for the gravel mine’s precinct, planned the “Town Hall Meeting.” This meeting, with rules set down by Moser, was not a public hearing--which would be subject to the state’s Open Meetings Act, and a matter of record. Attendees were told that they would not allowed to give testimony or to speak but had to write questions down on cards which were then read by Tom Pollard, the Kerr County Judge. Moser’s handling of the issue included cautioning the attendees that their testimony should remain “cordial” and that an armed Kerr County sheriff’s deputy had been stationed at the back of the room to maintain order.

Bureaucrats and Martin Marietta Allowed to Speak and Given Much Time

An endless parade of bureaucrats and Martin Marietta’s well-funded public relations division droned on for over an hour: Mike Coward from TXDOT; Ray Buck of the UGRA; John Hewitt, the discredited Kerr County Flood Plain Administrator (see an article about Hewitt’s conflict of interest when he worked for the Old River Road RV Park, on this website); TCEQ (Texas Commission on Environmental Quality), who granted MM’s permit the same day that it was submitted last week; Kerr County Airport Administrator Bruce McKenzie; and Tom Pollard, Kerr County Judge. MM’s Chance Allen stated in his presentation that MM “appreciated working in Kerr County, and that’s why we are here.” Moser was elected to the Precinct Two post on a campaign platform to put an end to the quarry depredations; his term will be over soon, with this promise unrealized, and no real effort to make it happen. Earlier newspaper articles quoted Moser as defending MM’s “property rights,” but Moser did not mention the property rights of the many residents so negatively affected by the mine—his own constituency.

City of Kerrville and Mayor Pratt Offer Hope

Mayor Jack Pratt of the City of Kerrville offered hope for MM’s victims, and he was the only elected official that spoke out forcefully against the gravel mine. Citing the loss of property tax revenues from the surrounding area’s diminished values, the quarry’s enormous groundwater demands, and the property rights of the adjacent homeowners, he said that the City of Kerrville had started annexation proceedings and would move forward with their plans to annex the MM property and its surrounding suburbs and stop the mining. MM’s past record in similar situations insures that they will probably sue the City of Kerrville. Pratt is up for re-election in May, and he and the city will need all the citizen support they can muster to win such a battle.

Trevor Hyde, President of Comanche Trace, Speaks Against MM

Jay Colvin Sold the New Quarry Site to MM for Five Million Dollars

By 8 p.m. Moser’s efforts to contain residents’ outrage had failed, and people began spontaneously demanding questions of MM and TCEQ. One of the most outspoken was Trevor Hyde, the President of Comanche Trace, an upscale subdivision nearby. Hyde handed out a 4-page publication (see attached) showing the new mine location as it looks today and an “After” photo of MM’s Bedrock quarry site on Hwy. 27, showing the utter devastation of the Guadalupe River and the landscape. According to Hyde, MM paid 5 million dollars for the new quarry site, which was purchased from Jay Colvin. Colvin is the brother of Richard Colvin, the former owner of approx. 400 acres further east on Hwy. 27. Richard Colvin was responsible for destroying the landscape and river with gravel mines, desecrating the Wellborn Family Cemetery, burying dead cows along the river, and planning an RV Park in the floodplain—before he lost it all in bankruptcy in 2010. Another handout showed the Bedrock facility clouded in dust, with a caption reading “Quarries in Kerr County DO NOT control dust, dirt, and noise, and TCEQ does nothing.” Krystal Henagan, Texas Field Organizer for Moms Clean Air Force (www.momscleanairforce.org) was also at the meeting, taking notes and talking to residents.

Fate of Depleted Mines an Issue: Remediation

MM stated that 45 acre feet of groundwater per year was purchased with the property (one acre foot is equal to 325,851 gallons, making MM’s yearly withdrawal 14 million six hundred sixty three thousand, two hundred and ninety five gallons—14,663,295 gallons—in an area of Kerr County known for its water depletion.) James F. Hayes, who formerly served as Director at Large on the Headwaters Groundwater Conservation Board, said that groundwater granted to MM by Headwaters violated regulations. Ray Buck, the Director of the UGRA, announced that the UGRA and the Kerr County Commissioners Court had recently completed an Interlocal agreement that would allow the holes created by the mines to be used as water “reservoirs.” This scheme has been criticized by water experts as not being feasible. At the very least, the reservoirs would hold water that should be going back to property owners’ wells and the Guadalupe River. The majority of other states place stringent rules and regulations on gravel mining, including complete remediation of the site after mining is completed. The state of Texas, largely due to well-funded corporate lobbying by entities such as the TACA, the Texas Aggregate and Concrete Association, allows gravel mining to destroy adjacent property owners with impunity, and then walk away from the eyesores left behind.

Adjacent Property Owners Sued MM in 2007

Martin Marietta expanded their Center Point Bedrock mining operation in 2007 when they started leasing a parcel just across Hwy. 27 from the Kerr County Airport, owned by developer Max Duncan. The 2007 mine is located at the NE corner of the historic H.M. Naylor Ranch, owned by J. Nelson Happy and Mary J. Matthews. After promises from then-Precinct Two Commissioner Bill Williams that MM’s floodplain permit would not be granted—promises that were reneged upon when all of the Commissioners voted FOR the permit to be granted—Matthews and Happy sued MM. A matter of public record, the lawsuit declared the gravel mine a “nuisance.” Two commissioners who voted for that gravel mine in 2008 are still on the Kerr County Commissioners Court: Buster Baldwin and Jonathan Letz. Former Commissioners Williams, Oehler, and Judge Tinley would undoubtedly still be serving as well, had they not died. Matthews and Happy settled with MM but the details of that settlement are covered by a confidentiality agreement. That parcel has now been mined out and Matthews and Happy are wrangling with MM over MM’s compliance with their agreement.

Further Actions

There are things that you, as an individual, can do. Kerr County Conscience advises citizens affected by the new Martin Marietta mine to unify into one organization and sue Martin Marietta. When combined with the city’s opposition, this may convince MM that mining this parcel is too big a price to pay. Even if a citizens’ lawsuit isn’t able to stop the mining, a lawsuit could force MM to only mine 8-5 during the week, no weekends or holidays, maintain dust and noise controls, control weeds and oak wilt, and after so many years of mining perform remediation.

By Mary J. Matthews for Kerr County Conscience

www.kerrcountyconscience.com

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HISTORIC CAMP VERDE ROAD SAVED

There were archaeologists; a beleaguered Kerr County Historical Commission Chair; a Native American; old-timers and recent immigrants; a recused Kerr County Commissioner; and a friendly, smooth-talking spokesperson for a multi-million dollar international corporation—the Kerr County Courthouse had its share of drama on Monday, Feb. 28, when the Commissioners Court met to receive public input on a proposed plan to abandon and sell the historic Camp Verde Road (owned by Kerr County) to Saint Christopher Properties, LLC (see accompanying article by Frances Lovett.)

After three hours of presentations and testimony, it appeared to be the impassioned pleas of old Kerr County families that swayed the Court, and caused Mr. Felipe Jimenez of Saint Christopher Properties, LLC (SCP LLC), to relent and withdraw the company’s petition.

THE COMMISSIONERS’ COURT

Guy Overby, Precinct Two’s new Commissioner (chosen by Judge Tinley for the Precinct, to replace deceased Commissioner Bill Williams) ignored the pleas of many of his own constituents by supporting SCP LLC’s petition. After huddling with Jimenez, Overby spoke vigorously and at length, reciting the economic benefits that he believed SCP LLC’s new restaurant would bring to Kerr County. Jimenez hinted darkly that the new restaurant wouldn’t happen without the road abandonment. Overby’s figures didn’t change the minds of the protesters.

Bruce Oehler, Commissioner for Precinct 4, might be called the hero of the day. Early in the afternoon, during Jimenez’s presentation (also lengthy), Oehler said that he “wasn’t convinced” that SCP LLC’s petition carried enough merit to outweigh the concerns of Kerr County residents. Rumor had it that Oehler received an onslaught of emails and telephone calls against the abandonment.

H.A. “Buster” Baldwin (Precinct 1), the Commission’s Liaison Appointment to work with and support the Kerr County Historic Commission, didn’t say a word, but beamed upon hearing that Robert E. Lee, while at Camp Verde, kept a pet rattlesnake.

One of the protesters’ dramatic triumphs of the day occurred when Commissioner Jonathan Letz (Precinct 3), the Court’s “enfant terrible,” recused himself from all proceedings on the subject, a scant few seconds before the meeting began. Several of the audience planned to ask Letz about rumors that his landscaping company was doing business with SCP LLC. Just before the meeting, Kerr County Attorney Rob Henneke was asked if Letz had filed a disclosure statement about this apparent conflict of interest. Although Henneke responded, “Yes, I think so,” the Kerr County Clerk’s office had no record of Letz’s disclosure statement.

Commissioner Letz, supposedly taking charge on an ill Commissioner Williams’ request, originally brought SCP LLC’s abandonment request before the Commission on Dec. 13, 2010. Due to the fact that the item on the Agenda was misworded (“Verde Creek Road” was used instead of the proper name, “Camp Verde Road”), Judge Tinley moved the issue to a later date, in spite of Mr. Letz’s urgings to continue.


THE COMMUNITY

Two Kerr County Historical Commission Chairpersons were largely responsible for the word getting out about the proposed action. Joseph Luther, Ph.D., a former Historical Commission Chair and professional historian, has extensively researched the Camp Verde historic site. On Nov. 5, 2010 he emailed numerous local contacts about the abandonment. Luther then went to the Hill Country Archaeological Association (HCAA) and asked them to support a request to the National Park Service, Dept. of the Interior, to designate the area as a National Historic Landmark. The HCAA rallied to the cause and many of its members were present at the hearing. Steve Stoutamire, President of the HCAA, gave an excellent presentation to the Court on the proposed historic designation plans.

Julia Mosty Leonard, the current Chair of the Kerr County Historical Commission, had the unenviable job of supporting the community’s concerns, while at the same time being politic with the Commissioner’s Court, which provides all of the Historical Commission’s funding. Monday’s decision proved her to be an exceptional and valuable champion of history in Kerr County.

The historic road appears to be an icon of the Hill Country, as passionate Kerr County residents spoke of their feelings for the road today and their memories of it in the past. One woman, moved to tears, drove from Houston to testify, and remembered driving the road with her mother and father. A tall, gray-haired man spoke haltingly of how he “just likes to drive down the road.” Gerald Witt, a former pilot and author of one of the County’s seminal histories (which now sells for over $100 a copy on Ebay), spoke eloquently to the Court about the road’s significance and the need for its preservation. Dan Simpson, a Native American and Vietnam Vet, spoke to Commissioners Baldwin, Tinley, and Oehler, and told them shortly that the abandonment “just shouldn’t happen.”

The clincher came when Mrs. Clarabelle Snodgrass, 97, tottered up to the podium and told the Commissioners to save the road. Snodgrass has dedicated at least 30 years of her life to the placement of historic markers around the County. She recently received the Governor’s Award, the Texas Historical Commission’s highest commendation.

BIG BUSINESS

Mr. Felipe Jimenez, representing SCP LLC, graciously conceded defeat when he withdrew the company’s petition, citing the overwhelming community response. Remaining cool and collected throughout the day, Jimenez reflected the sophistication and unusual business savvy shown by Saint Christopher Properties. It was obvious that the company had become convinced that community support was more important than the road abandonment. After the hearing, a large group of protesters adjourned to the Camp Verde Store for lunch—and Jimenez footed the bill.

Mary J. Matthews, for Kerr County Conscience

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Camp Verde Road ---- UPDATE

The Commissioners Court vote on closure of the Camp Verde Road was not taken at the December 13th meeting. The agenda item had erroneously listed Verde Creek Road thus it will be rescheduled for a public hearing and vote at the February 28 Commissioner's Court Meeting.

During the court session and afterward several questions arose:
  • Will our new Commissioner Overby speak accurately for the Precinct 2 voters or will he lean toward corporate interests? Commissioner Letz originally scheduled the road closure vote as a "security issue" for the adjoining landowners now we know the landowners plan to build an up-scale restaurant. The road would interfere with the architect's design.
  • Do the beneficiaries of a Camp Verde Road closure have any interest in historic preservation of the road or do they need the county real estate the road occupies for their own expansion? Christopher Jimenez represented Christopher Properties the adjoining land owner and Camelot Hills Group owners of the Camp Verde Store. He verbalized support for historic interests but questioned the accuracy of historic research and publication on the road.
  • Should county and state historic tourism interests and revenue be sacrificed for the corporate interests of Christopher Properties and Camelot Hills Group?
  • Will commissioners consider the value of Camp Verde Road as a part of the overall beauty and tourism for the Camp Verde area?
The public hearing and vote is scheduled for the February 28th Commissioner's Court meeting at the Court House. It is a county wide issue and requires a unanimous vote to close the road. Your opinion matters.

Frances Lovett

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Keeping Them Safe or Keeping Citizens Out

Should Camp Verde Road from HW 173 to Loop 480 be vacated, abandoned and discontinued by the county? The San Antonio resident who owns the land on both sides of the road has requested the road be closed citing security concerns. If the county abandons the roadway it would essentially become the property of the landowner.


Commissioner Letz presented the request in Commissioner's Court on 11-8-10. The commissioners scheduled a public hearing at Commissioner's Court for 12-13-10. The security concerns were not given.

Photos show the road to be a beautiful, peaceful respite and a drive along this stretch proves to be even more intriguing. The road is well maintained and utilized by local residents. Several vehicles passed over the road during the short time I was there.



Will commissioners consider the value of Camp Verde road to the entire Kerr County before voting? Should the interests of one property owner take precedent over interests of the entire county and state? What are the security concerns stated by the property owner? Why are there security concerns on this stretch of Camp Verde Road and not on the stretch to the west of HW 173? Why are the security concerns on this county road any different from any other county road? Wouldl the loss of this section of Camp Verde Road to a private property owner diminish the attraction of the Camp Verde area's heritage tourism? How would the loss affect Center Point?



The real story here goes beyond the interest of a single property owner or the casual mention in commissioner's court. The fairly new landowners bought their property with full knowledge of the road's status as county property. The value of Camp Verde Road for local, county and state residents is significant. The road's elegance and history speaks for itself as a valuable county asset.


Historians note the rich history of the Camp Verde area with the Camp Verde Road playing an integral role. This road dates back hundreds of years to the Commanche Trail from east Texas and was the only original access to the old Camp Verde Store established in 1857. In the immediate area are sites of frontier battles, ranger stations and burial grounds important to Kerr County and the entire state.



As increasing numbers of Kerr County citizens and planners look toward tourism as a source of revenue the Camp Verde area should be preserved and maximized. The Camp Verde Road is an essential component of this attraction. The loss of this road would mean lost tourism dollars for the entire county. Plans for a historical marker for the roadside park adjacent to the road would not be possible.



Center Point residents cannot afford to lose another piece of their heritage and natural beauty. Recent losses to the area include destruction of the old government crossing bridge, commissioner's plans to replace the Center Point Dam bridge, loss of historic cemeteries and progressive gravel mining and industrialization along the river. All of the above have had a detrimental effect on Center Point's current recreation and potential to promote future recreation and tourism.



The commissioners will most likely vote on the road closure request at their 12-13-10 meeting immediately after the 10:00 am hearing. Your thoughts can be presented at the hearing or contact your commissioner. Additionally, you can tell us what you think right here by clicking on the green word “comments” below or if you have a white box login (it’s safe) and type in the big box. Please, share your thoughts!!

Frances Lovett

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