Serving Kerr County with a Conscience

Martin Marietta in Kerr County and Texas


Letters to the Editor continue the accurate listing of the negatives of the new Martin Marietta gravel mine - outside of a dozen jobs and some taxes paid by MM there are few positives. And those jobs may not be nearly as desirable or beneficial to Kerrville as the potential harm to the airport business community and surrounding housing developments. Maybe the paychecks do not even stay in Kerr County - a lot of things down TX 27 seem to be sliding or being pushed towards the Comfort and Kendall County economy. Yet, local politicos keep voting for these projects? Good to see our Chamber finally speaking out and taking a strong and logical position against this particular site - not MM, but the location they chose.

Sand and gravel mining in Texas is likely a lot more profitable than in other states which have good state laws and regulations regulating sites, operations, community welfare, environmental protections and, importantly, a state agency that enforces the letter and the spirit of laws protecting our waters, air, land, wildlife, neighbors and the business community. Until Texas legislators stand up and pass such laws we will continue to be the profitable target of both local and out of state projects taking full advantage of weak or non-existent laws and enforcement.

WE have to push our Texas senators and representatives to do their job to protect Texas for the future - not just for immediate profits and election donations. Be involved in the present election of our new state Senator - after they are elected, it is hard to remove any of them. Get it right now. Our beautiful Guadalupe River, the Kerrville valley and the watershed all need our oversight and involvement or soon it may not be the attractive town and county we now enjoy.

Mike Mecke

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Kerr County Quarry Meeting

SHOCK AND DESPAIR DESCRIBE VICTIMS OF MARTIN MARIETTA

January 28, 2016, from Kerrville, Texas

Gravel Giant Martin Marietta (MM) Rushes Ahead

On Wednesday evening, January 27 at 6 p.m. at the Kerr County Livestock Pavilion, a tragic event unfolded as residents of Kerr County attended a “town hall meeting” scheduled by Precinct Two Commissioner Tom Moser. Many people attended; the parking lot at the pavilion was full and all of the chairs were taken in the vast hall. The subject was corporate mogul Martin Marietta’s new Kerr County gravel mine, which has been established in the ETJ (extra territorial jurisdiction) of the city of Kerrville, amidst subdivisions, heavy Highway 27 traffic, and across the street from Our Lady of The Hills Catholic High School.

In spite of the meeting scheduled last night and ongoing efforts to stop the mine, MM chose to ignore local, county, and state officials, and began excavations on the property the week of January 18th.

Victims in Shock

The mood could be described as one of shock and despair as surrounding property owners and those affected by the mine wandered in and out of the meeting. As revealed by some public questions, the large majority had never been involved in such a conflict before, and they were ill-equipped to deal with the complexities of fighting the gravel mine. Several asked “Will Kerr County buy the property after it is mined?” Obviously the answer to this question is “No.” Many were bitterly resigned to the fact that their homes, the result of a life-time’s work that they hoped to pass onto their children, were suddenly rendered worthless. One attendee, Mrs. Donald Oates, had lived in her house for 40 years, and had already given it to her children; now instead of the beautiful Guadalupe Valley river view, the property would be overlooking a gravel mine, with all of the attendant dust, dirt, noise, and traffic.

Moser Censures Testimony

The meeting was sponsored by the Kerr County Commissioner’s Court. Tom Moser, Commissioner for the gravel mine’s precinct, planned the “Town Hall Meeting.” This meeting, with rules set down by Moser, was not a public hearing--which would be subject to the state’s Open Meetings Act, and a matter of record. Attendees were told that they would not allowed to give testimony or to speak but had to write questions down on cards which were then read by Tom Pollard, the Kerr County Judge. Moser’s handling of the issue included cautioning the attendees that their testimony should remain “cordial” and that an armed Kerr County sheriff’s deputy had been stationed at the back of the room to maintain order.

Bureaucrats and Martin Marietta Allowed to Speak and Given Much Time

An endless parade of bureaucrats and Martin Marietta’s well-funded public relations division droned on for over an hour: Mike Coward from TXDOT; Ray Buck of the UGRA; John Hewitt, the discredited Kerr County Flood Plain Administrator (see an article about Hewitt’s conflict of interest when he worked for the Old River Road RV Park, on this website); TCEQ (Texas Commission on Environmental Quality), who granted MM’s permit the same day that it was submitted last week; Kerr County Airport Administrator Bruce McKenzie; and Tom Pollard, Kerr County Judge. MM’s Chance Allen stated in his presentation that MM “appreciated working in Kerr County, and that’s why we are here.” Moser was elected to the Precinct Two post on a campaign platform to put an end to the quarry depredations; his term will be over soon, with this promise unrealized, and no real effort to make it happen. Earlier newspaper articles quoted Moser as defending MM’s “property rights,” but Moser did not mention the property rights of the many residents so negatively affected by the mine—his own constituency.

City of Kerrville and Mayor Pratt Offer Hope

Mayor Jack Pratt of the City of Kerrville offered hope for MM’s victims, and he was the only elected official that spoke out forcefully against the gravel mine. Citing the loss of property tax revenues from the surrounding area’s diminished values, the quarry’s enormous groundwater demands, and the property rights of the adjacent homeowners, he said that the City of Kerrville had started annexation proceedings and would move forward with their plans to annex the MM property and its surrounding suburbs and stop the mining. MM’s past record in similar situations insures that they will probably sue the City of Kerrville. Pratt is up for re-election in May, and he and the city will need all the citizen support they can muster to win such a battle.

Trevor Hyde, President of Comanche Trace, Speaks Against MM

Jay Colvin Sold the New Quarry Site to MM for Five Million Dollars

By 8 p.m. Moser’s efforts to contain residents’ outrage had failed, and people began spontaneously demanding questions of MM and TCEQ. One of the most outspoken was Trevor Hyde, the President of Comanche Trace, an upscale subdivision nearby. Hyde handed out a 4-page publication (see attached) showing the new mine location as it looks today and an “After” photo of MM’s Bedrock quarry site on Hwy. 27, showing the utter devastation of the Guadalupe River and the landscape. According to Hyde, MM paid 5 million dollars for the new quarry site, which was purchased from Jay Colvin. Colvin is the brother of Richard Colvin, the former owner of approx. 400 acres further east on Hwy. 27. Richard Colvin was responsible for destroying the landscape and river with gravel mines, desecrating the Wellborn Family Cemetery, burying dead cows along the river, and planning an RV Park in the floodplain—before he lost it all in bankruptcy in 2010. Another handout showed the Bedrock facility clouded in dust, with a caption reading “Quarries in Kerr County DO NOT control dust, dirt, and noise, and TCEQ does nothing.” Krystal Henagan, Texas Field Organizer for Moms Clean Air Force (www.momscleanairforce.org) was also at the meeting, taking notes and talking to residents.

Fate of Depleted Mines an Issue: Remediation

MM stated that 45 acre feet of groundwater per year was purchased with the property (one acre foot is equal to 325,851 gallons, making MM’s yearly withdrawal 14 million six hundred sixty three thousand, two hundred and ninety five gallons—14,663,295 gallons—in an area of Kerr County known for its water depletion.) James F. Hayes, who formerly served as Director at Large on the Headwaters Groundwater Conservation Board, said that groundwater granted to MM by Headwaters violated regulations. Ray Buck, the Director of the UGRA, announced that the UGRA and the Kerr County Commissioners Court had recently completed an Interlocal agreement that would allow the holes created by the mines to be used as water “reservoirs.” This scheme has been criticized by water experts as not being feasible. At the very least, the reservoirs would hold water that should be going back to property owners’ wells and the Guadalupe River. The majority of other states place stringent rules and regulations on gravel mining, including complete remediation of the site after mining is completed. The state of Texas, largely due to well-funded corporate lobbying by entities such as the TACA, the Texas Aggregate and Concrete Association, allows gravel mining to destroy adjacent property owners with impunity, and then walk away from the eyesores left behind.

Adjacent Property Owners Sued MM in 2007

Martin Marietta expanded their Center Point Bedrock mining operation in 2007 when they started leasing a parcel just across Hwy. 27 from the Kerr County Airport, owned by developer Max Duncan. The 2007 mine is located at the NE corner of the historic H.M. Naylor Ranch, owned by J. Nelson Happy and Mary J. Matthews. After promises from then-Precinct Two Commissioner Bill Williams that MM’s floodplain permit would not be granted—promises that were reneged upon when all of the Commissioners voted FOR the permit to be granted—Matthews and Happy sued MM. A matter of public record, the lawsuit declared the gravel mine a “nuisance.” Two commissioners who voted for that gravel mine in 2008 are still on the Kerr County Commissioners Court: Buster Baldwin and Jonathan Letz. Former Commissioners Williams, Oehler, and Judge Tinley would undoubtedly still be serving as well, had they not died. Matthews and Happy settled with MM but the details of that settlement are covered by a confidentiality agreement. That parcel has now been mined out and Matthews and Happy are wrangling with MM over MM’s compliance with their agreement.

Further Actions

There are things that you, as an individual, can do. Kerr County Conscience advises citizens affected by the new Martin Marietta mine to unify into one organization and sue Martin Marietta. When combined with the city’s opposition, this may convince MM that mining this parcel is too big a price to pay. Even if a citizens’ lawsuit isn’t able to stop the mining, a lawsuit could force MM to only mine 8-5 during the week, no weekends or holidays, maintain dust and noise controls, control weeds and oak wilt, and after so many years of mining perform remediation.

By Mary J. Matthews for Kerr County Conscience

www.kerrcountyconscience.com

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​An Unsafe Septic System

The septic system under construction for Old River Road RV Resort bypasses safeguards for public health and safety. An onsite septic facility (OSSF) is being installed with tanks and drain-fields designated for servicing 25 people or less. OSSF’s are the usual residential systems.

The RV park’s septic system lies over the Guadalupe River’s recharge zone. Installing a septic system on the RV park site is not contraindicated. However, the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality (TCEQ) has specific rules and precautions for RV septic systems, they are more expensive than an OSSF. The Environmental Protection Agency refers to such systems as large capacity septic systems (LCSS). The TCEQ standards are based on the 5000-gallon rule—any project producing 5000 gallons of sewage per day requires a large capacity septic system application and oversight by the TCEQ. The RV developers evade this rule and TCEQ oversight by dividing the 240 unit development into three sections, each needing less disposal capacity than 5000 gallons.

RV parks present specific problems for septic systems. In addition to the higher volume produced by the convergence of people within a small area, the waste is more concentrated because less water is used in RVs. Toilet contents are made more caustic by strong chemicals and deodorants used to control tank odors. These conditions accelerate corrosion and septic system failures. The LCSS rules are designed to extend the life of a septic system from the usual 15 years to 30 years. Still, RV septic systems often fail prematurely.

The septic permit issued to the RV park compromises the health of the Guadalupe. The riverbank, adjoining terrain and fields serve as a sponge, absorbing water during wet weather. Referred to as riparian, its water continually migrates through the soil toward the river. Seeps and springs from riparian zones replenish the river during drought and are essential to its continuous flow and health.

The RV park’s septic tanks and drain-fields are embedded in this riparian sponge. We can expect the heavier than normal bacterial count and untreated caustic chemicals percolating from the septic system to mix with the naturally migrating water and seep into the adjacent Guadalupe. The predictability of early tank corrosion and system failure presents the risk of surface pollution draining directly into the river. The health and safety of RV park occupants is in immediate danger with such surface contamination.

Survival of the adjacent public recreation area, Brinks Crossing, is questionable. This Guadalupe swimming hole named the third best in the state in a 2008 edition of Texas Monthly and again hyped in 2012, receives the runoff, seeps and migrating water directly from the RV park’s septic system. Additionally, the river will carry any fecal and chemical contaminants the short distance downstream to Lions Park Dam, a busy swimming destination for children. Is it possible river contamination at this site could sacrifice the Guadalupe as a statewide recreational attraction?

There are no public safeguards such as inspections for breakdowns, measuring river contamination or ensuring repairs when failures occur. Kerr County’s Environmental Health Department who issued the OSSF permit is not staffed for such monitoring. The department depends upon the public and owners to self-report failures. Can we expect this owner who is avoiding the safety of an LCSS system and TCEQ oversight to self-report?

Many Texas counties have specific rules for construction of RV park septic systems. Kerr County has no guidelines, nor do we have a licensed sanitarian available to counsel our county employees tasked with issuing the RV park’s OSSF permit. Of course, the accepted path of following the 5000 gallon rule would assure TCEQ oversight of planning, construction and maintenance through an LCSS permit.

Our county officials spent untold time and energy plus $3 million on the Kerrville South Wastewater Project designed to replace failing residential septic systems polluting a Guadalupe tributary. A similar plan, the Center Point Wastewater Project, will cost an estimated $44 million to replace deteriorating OSSF’s threatening the river. Now county officials ignore the RV park’s immediate source of contamination—drain fields leeching into the riparian’s recharge. The septic tanks and connecting systems are at high risk for failure long before their 15-year lifespan is reached.

Elected officials are aware of the project’s health and safety issues. They also know that TCEQ oversight of this septic system could prevent much of the damage. Does it seem reasonable for authorities to ignore or perhaps support the creation of another site, sure to require taxpayer funding for cleanup, while the Center Point project is still in the planning stage? Is it possible the RV park site will need cleanup before the Center Point project is completed?

Frances Lovett

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Open Letter to Kerrville Daily Times

Mr. Armstrong,


Thank you and the KDT for your continued coverage of water issues. I hope you will be able to correct a statement in yesterday's edition. Specifically, "restrictions imposed by the state on how much water the city can pull from the Guadalupe River have curtailed the city's safe operating capacity". Actually, there is almost no water in the Guadalupe River to pull. TCEQ only requires the city to maintain the same river flow out of Town Lake that flows into the lake during periods of low flow. During periods of above normal flow the city is required to simply maintain normal flow over the dam. There has been very little flow into Town Lake for months and the TCEQ cannot produce additional river water. The city of Kerrville has free access to all the water in Town Lake they simply must assure that the same amount flows over the dam as flows into the lake.

You should be aware that Charlie Hastings, Director of Public Works, has blamed the TCEQ's watermaster program for Kerrville water restrictions in previous years by promoting the idea that the city is being punished. Your article implies that untruth is being promoted again. The TCEQ (state) does not dictate anything beyond assuring the river continues to flow. I hope you will take a critical look at the facts surrounding river pumping and provide a factual analysis to your readers.

The Kerr County Conscience website provides historical data from the USGS gauges located along the river in Kerr County. I believe a brief check of this data is invaluable to understanding that our current river water situation is indeed a crisis which we cannot blame on the state. Click here to view this data.

Frances Lovett

East Kerr County

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WILL GROWTH AFFECT OUR WATER?

By: Mike Mecke, Kerrville

Natural Resource Manager & Water Specialist – Retired


YES! It seems the destiny of Texas is to grow. We are exploding in population from within, from out-of-state – all together it is a very serious picture. Texas, for the most part, has limited water resources. Much of the growth is occurring along or west of I-35/I-37, which is a region known for frequent and often severe droughts. The semi-arid Central Texas’ Hill Country is where vegetation and climate from the East meets plants and climate from the West and the deserts beyond. And now, where old, largely German or just pioneer-settled towns meets tens of thousands of new comers…… us!

A high percentage of our new Hill Country newcomers came here from wetter regions or out of state. At least, that seems to be true in Kerr, Kendall and Gillespie Counties. Many of our younger or new Texans did not endure the Drought of the Fifties, as many older residents did. That intense seven to ten year drought (depending upon where you lived) was a character builder and a severe trial especially for Texas farmers and ranchers. Some turned to new irrigation afterwards. Many did not make it. You must read our Texas “bible” for those times by the late, great Elmer Kelton “The Time it Never Rained”. Elmer was at his best in that absorbing fifties novel of a family and a boy growing up and existing on a Texas ranch at that time. He makes you feel that hot, dusty drought and see the social conditions - they endure in your mind!

Growth and expanding population, home building and new businesses seem to be the main goals of most city officials, councils and the development community. That viral disease has seized even small town Texas and the Hill Country seems to be a major target area due to its beauty, climate, many rivers, springs and convenient location to major cities. We seem to be in the process of sometimes killing or destroying what we came here to enjoy and appreciate in these quaint small towns with their clear rivers, history and peaceful rural life.

The Hill Country and many areas of Texas cannot handle a lot of growth simply because there are not the water supplies to support higher populations, especially during prolonged, severe drought. Many new residents now want their homes and towns to resemble “back home” with large lush green landscapes, parks and golf courses. Years ago, water was not an issue in most cities and towns. Now it is!

There is little or no understanding of a term that is familiar to ranchers called“carrying capacity”. On a ranch or in a pasture, it means the numbers of animals, including livestock, deer and exotics, which can be maintained without damaging the desired rangeland vegetation. In good years and in drought these numbers will be managed to fit
the conditions. It is always limited by the production of desired forage and by rainfall.

2.
Mecke – Growth & Water


Personally, I think towns, cities, counties and regions also have a sustainable carrying capacity for people. Water is the limiting factor usually. There is a practical and ethical limit to how much water we can beg, borrow, buy or steal from adjoining neighbors without damaging either them or the environment. These issues are now facing Texans from Amarillo to the Rio Grande Valley and from El Paso east to Dallas, San Antonio or Houston.

Many areas of the state are now beginning to realize that our groundwater – aquifers– do not exist on county lines, so geographic groups of counties utilizing the same aquifers are forming Groundwater Management Areas (GMA’s). In Kerr, we are in GMA-9. This is an improvement in groundwater management and protection as people then work together to arrive at plans for water pumping and to derive a view of what they want their aquifer to look like in the distant future……maybe: the same as now, or wells averaging 20 ft. lower, or other standards? It is causing some heartburn for people in neighboring counties or towns with differing goals for their groundwater and their area’s growth. Some of us live in small towns because we like small towns. Others may want unlimited growth or financial rewards and would be happy to see a big city grow up in our Hill Country.

Too much well pumping affects groundwater levels and spring flows. This can be a disaster for our springs, creeks and rivers - especially in a long drought. All Hill Country streams arise from springs. Downstream bays and estuaries would suffer from reduced freshwater flow and nutrients. It is all connected isn’t it?

Excessive growth is becoming more and more important across the state as we continue to grow in often poorly planned or not well organized developments and communities. Get involved locally in water meetings. Texas needs to have smart growth. Water is NOT like any other “commodity” as there is no substitute!

Truly, Water is Life!

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HISTORIC CAMP VERDE ROAD SAVED

There were archaeologists; a beleaguered Kerr County Historical Commission Chair; a Native American; old-timers and recent immigrants; a recused Kerr County Commissioner; and a friendly, smooth-talking spokesperson for a multi-million dollar international corporation—the Kerr County Courthouse had its share of drama on Monday, Feb. 28, when the Commissioners Court met to receive public input on a proposed plan to abandon and sell the historic Camp Verde Road (owned by Kerr County) to Saint Christopher Properties, LLC (see accompanying article by Frances Lovett.)

After three hours of presentations and testimony, it appeared to be the impassioned pleas of old Kerr County families that swayed the Court, and caused Mr. Felipe Jimenez of Saint Christopher Properties, LLC (SCP LLC), to relent and withdraw the company’s petition.

THE COMMISSIONERS’ COURT

Guy Overby, Precinct Two’s new Commissioner (chosen by Judge Tinley for the Precinct, to replace deceased Commissioner Bill Williams) ignored the pleas of many of his own constituents by supporting SCP LLC’s petition. After huddling with Jimenez, Overby spoke vigorously and at length, reciting the economic benefits that he believed SCP LLC’s new restaurant would bring to Kerr County. Jimenez hinted darkly that the new restaurant wouldn’t happen without the road abandonment. Overby’s figures didn’t change the minds of the protesters.

Bruce Oehler, Commissioner for Precinct 4, might be called the hero of the day. Early in the afternoon, during Jimenez’s presentation (also lengthy), Oehler said that he “wasn’t convinced” that SCP LLC’s petition carried enough merit to outweigh the concerns of Kerr County residents. Rumor had it that Oehler received an onslaught of emails and telephone calls against the abandonment.

H.A. “Buster” Baldwin (Precinct 1), the Commission’s Liaison Appointment to work with and support the Kerr County Historic Commission, didn’t say a word, but beamed upon hearing that Robert E. Lee, while at Camp Verde, kept a pet rattlesnake.

One of the protesters’ dramatic triumphs of the day occurred when Commissioner Jonathan Letz (Precinct 3), the Court’s “enfant terrible,” recused himself from all proceedings on the subject, a scant few seconds before the meeting began. Several of the audience planned to ask Letz about rumors that his landscaping company was doing business with SCP LLC. Just before the meeting, Kerr County Attorney Rob Henneke was asked if Letz had filed a disclosure statement about this apparent conflict of interest. Although Henneke responded, “Yes, I think so,” the Kerr County Clerk’s office had no record of Letz’s disclosure statement.

Commissioner Letz, supposedly taking charge on an ill Commissioner Williams’ request, originally brought SCP LLC’s abandonment request before the Commission on Dec. 13, 2010. Due to the fact that the item on the Agenda was misworded (“Verde Creek Road” was used instead of the proper name, “Camp Verde Road”), Judge Tinley moved the issue to a later date, in spite of Mr. Letz’s urgings to continue.


THE COMMUNITY

Two Kerr County Historical Commission Chairpersons were largely responsible for the word getting out about the proposed action. Joseph Luther, Ph.D., a former Historical Commission Chair and professional historian, has extensively researched the Camp Verde historic site. On Nov. 5, 2010 he emailed numerous local contacts about the abandonment. Luther then went to the Hill Country Archaeological Association (HCAA) and asked them to support a request to the National Park Service, Dept. of the Interior, to designate the area as a National Historic Landmark. The HCAA rallied to the cause and many of its members were present at the hearing. Steve Stoutamire, President of the HCAA, gave an excellent presentation to the Court on the proposed historic designation plans.

Julia Mosty Leonard, the current Chair of the Kerr County Historical Commission, had the unenviable job of supporting the community’s concerns, while at the same time being politic with the Commissioner’s Court, which provides all of the Historical Commission’s funding. Monday’s decision proved her to be an exceptional and valuable champion of history in Kerr County.

The historic road appears to be an icon of the Hill Country, as passionate Kerr County residents spoke of their feelings for the road today and their memories of it in the past. One woman, moved to tears, drove from Houston to testify, and remembered driving the road with her mother and father. A tall, gray-haired man spoke haltingly of how he “just likes to drive down the road.” Gerald Witt, a former pilot and author of one of the County’s seminal histories (which now sells for over $100 a copy on Ebay), spoke eloquently to the Court about the road’s significance and the need for its preservation. Dan Simpson, a Native American and Vietnam Vet, spoke to Commissioners Baldwin, Tinley, and Oehler, and told them shortly that the abandonment “just shouldn’t happen.”

The clincher came when Mrs. Clarabelle Snodgrass, 97, tottered up to the podium and told the Commissioners to save the road. Snodgrass has dedicated at least 30 years of her life to the placement of historic markers around the County. She recently received the Governor’s Award, the Texas Historical Commission’s highest commendation.

BIG BUSINESS

Mr. Felipe Jimenez, representing SCP LLC, graciously conceded defeat when he withdrew the company’s petition, citing the overwhelming community response. Remaining cool and collected throughout the day, Jimenez reflected the sophistication and unusual business savvy shown by Saint Christopher Properties. It was obvious that the company had become convinced that community support was more important than the road abandonment. After the hearing, a large group of protesters adjourned to the Camp Verde Store for lunch—and Jimenez footed the bill.

Mary J. Matthews, for Kerr County Conscience

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Do quarry neighbors have rights?


Our recent rains have been great, but KCC folks have been in the county a goodly many years, and we know that with summer upon us, the dust and noise from our neighboring quarries will soon pick up again.

There’s nothing we can do about it.

As our county officials support the industrialization of the Highway 27 corridor, and while all that dust and noise billows up from the quarry properties, mine owners are allowed to do whatever they choose. They are big business. I’m just a private landowner.

Over here on my property, I breathe nasty air, and I can’t even enjoy a peaceful evening, relaxing in my own home, much less by the river, not with the quarries pounding away, day and night, night and day.

At a town hall meeting in New Braunfels, over in Comal County, I heard a Martin Marietta lobbyist boldly state that their company adheres to all state laws. Yet some Comal County residents had unanswered complaints about broken windows, cracked foundations and caved-in wells from blasting at the neighboring Martin Marietta mine.

In actuality, there are no Texas state laws regulating quarry operations.

Also, that lobbyist failed to inform the audience that he and other powerful quarry lobbyists had successfully defeated a modest regulatory bill previously introduced by Texas State Senator Troy Fraser. The only piece of the bill to survive was a clause stating that all gravel loads on a public road must be covered.

Texas does have laws specific to air quality which govern emissions from any industrial operation. The Texas Commission on Environmental Quality (TCEQ) applies these laws to quarry operations in an effort to control emissions of particulates and dust into the air. A drive down Highway 27 from Kerrville to Comfort will verify the absence of enforcement as the ground dries out and summer operations crank up.

Dust billows from the pits and on-site roads. White dirt builds up on the highway at the pit entrances. Quarry neighbors ought to be able to expect a few neighborly courtesies from the pit owners.

All this particular landowner is asking for is a sensible, decent, and neighborly approach to their business model. This would include...
  • reasonable hours of operation,
  • noise control,
  • dust control from the mining operations and on-site roads,
  • reasonable protection of the river, river bottom and floodplain; and,
  • remediation when the mines are depleted.
Moreover, we need our local government’s help.

Our elected officials should report to water authorities, such as the TCEQ and HGCD, the amount of river- and well water that is being used to facilitate mining, gravel-washing processes and dust control.

We also need an objective assessment by those officials on the short term tax gain vs. the long term loss of land productivity, river tourism and road repairs caused by heavy truck traffic. They should regularly monitor the particulate matter that is emitted into the air from the cluster of five quarries within our small area.

Finally, we need law enforcement and protection from the speeding trucks and flying gravel.

I think we need a Quarry Neighbor’s Bill of Rights. That might get someone interested in our plight. But the rain today is so nice. I could just sit here and look at the dust on my shelves, at the pictures of my loved ones and at my precious knickknacks. Why not look outside and enjoy the beautiful Hill Country? Because just across the fence, I can see what the miners are doing to these beautiful hills…and it’s the pits!

Frances Lovett

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